Finding a New Home

25/03/2021

Painful is the only way I can summarise moving house & I move a lot. Looking back, I have an average of moving every 3 years and for many different reasons, Buying & Selling, moving for size & more space and so on.

My 2021 move though has given me the complete perspective of a tenant though & in the area that I work in which I have not experienced before. So, for a few reasons, I found myself looking for a rental property to make a base for The Management Agency for a year or so while I plan my next property move.

Obviously, I hear firsthand from tenants that I meet about what they go through but going through this process has really given me a new insight & newfound respect for tenants that are actively looking in the rental market. Boy has the rental market woken up in 2021, supply levels are way down on 2020 and there are many prospective tenants still looking to make a move and some really need to move. So needless to say there were ques and a lot of interest in the Surry Hills & Redfern area as we’ve been seeing across our own viewings.

I won’t name & shame, now or ever, thankfully the managing agents for the property I secured are amazing but just Picture this;

I went to a property in Surry Hills which was two levels, lined up, masked up and QR coded in. The agent was only allowing one group at a time. Mind you there was a line through the building & they had set a total of 10 minutes for the Open House.

As the property was still occupied, we were only allowed to inspect 1 of the 2 levels. So, none of the prospective tenants could see the bedrooms or bathroom. Who is going to rent a property that they’ve barely seen? NO ONE, and yes, I did storm out of that property as my Saturday morning was wasting away, the first Saturday I’d had off in ages as all of my properties had been leased.

Needless to say, it was ½ an hour after the “open house” had begun, so much for the 10-minute window.

What would I have done differently? For a start, I would not have shown the property or advertised it until after the tenant had moved. It was obvious that they weren’t comfortable with people going into the property due to COVID-19 which is not the issue, but if you’re going to put a property on the market, with one external building photo mind you, do it properly and allow people to see the whole property.

That’s just one example & I’m not saying I’ve never been late for a legitimate reason or shown a property that’s not 100% ready or it might’ve been mid-renovation or whatever but still… for the most part all I experienced was a lot of waiting around past appointment times & no real interest or care from Leasing agents. Little requests for feedback or general courtesy, it’s no wonder we’re viewed so poorly!

Landlords, prospective tenants face huge barriers to being able to rent your properties, so if you doubt your property is being offered effectively then get involved.

Tenants, I feel for you. Saturday’s viewings are like being a contestant on The Amazing Race, less the Amazing part. I don’t know what to tell you, I can see that tenants can be turned off properties simply because of the barriers they face, the unanswered questions, competition & in some cases, the unfortunate attitude of agents that they face.

Thankfully though as I mentioned, locked in a cute Terrace (Pet Friendly) with an efficient agency and the boxes are getting unpacked. Who wants to hear how the rest of the move worked out? Comment below!

Antonio Mesiti is the Principal & Property Manager at The Management Agency, a local Property Management specialist offering a one on one service for his Property Investor clients.

For more information visit; https://themanagementagency.com.au/about/

 

Need To Know – Legislation Update

24/02/2021

I recently took over the management of a property and the lease was invalid for multiple reasons. For a start- the name listed for the landlord on the lease said “Contact Agent” and it only got worse from there. Landlords & Tenants need a lease that is valid, to begin with (obviously) and gives everyone some certainty surrounding their agreement.

2020 was a lot to take in, so to digest some of the legislation changes & recent updates so here I’ll briefly summarise what you all need-to-know!

NCAT Jurisdiction and why Leases were updated in Sept 2020

NCAT, short for NSW Civil & Administrative Tribunal, is the go-to Tribunal for disputes in Tenancy situations. NCAT can make enforceable orders on parties to resolve issues ranging from arrears to possession to damage claims.A little-known fact is that in some cases NCAT may refer the matter to Local or District courts if the landlord is not a resident of NSW. There’s quite a bit of reading on that matter here.Leases were just updated in Sept 2020 where landlords have to disclose their state or country of residence if it is not NSW. This may help NCAT filter through and decide on what matters they can and can’t hear even though they may have to be the first port of call.

The lease Agreement must have this specific info

Leases must now have tenants’ email addresses listed in order for tenants to give consent to receiving any notices or correspondence via email. Leases must also list 1 form of contact for a landlord, either a phone number or email address.

ID Requirements for Landlords

Before leasing or taking on the management of a Property, Property Managers must fulfil an ID Check for landlords to confirm their identity and their ownership of the Property. This has been in place where enlisting an agent to sell a property for some time but is new to Property Management

Information Statements for Landlords & Tenants

There is a new Information Statement each for Landlords and Tenants. Tenants have to be provided a copy on or before signing their lease. For Landlords, they’re required to read and acknowledge having read the statement before a lease is signed, an important step.

Material Fact Disclosure

Material Fact has been around for some time now but the facts that need to be disclosed do get reworked and reworded. For instance, Landlords and therefore agents, need to disclose to tenants if they are aware of any major rectification or works scheduled in a Strata Complex that would impact tenants during their lease. Essentially, a material fact is about sharing the information that you know whilst also protecting landlords if you’re not in the know.

Extension of the Moratorium on Evictions- extended & in place to 26 March 2021

Aside from a stop on COVID-19 Impacted tenant terminations, the moratorium also keeps in place extended notice periods to 90 Days’ notice for other forms of Terminations notices, such as for the End of Fixed Term & Breaches of Agreement.

The Management Agency wishes you all the best for 2021, I know it’s flying by already and we’re working away in what is already turning out to be a busy rental market with a lot of leasing activity already well underway which is already an improvement on 2020.

Thank you for your support, following, and reading!

Antonio Mesiti is the Principal & Property Manager at The Management Agency, a local Property Management specialist offering a one on one and end to end service for his Property Investor clients. For more information visit; https://themanagementagency.com.au/about/

Renting with Pets

21/10/2020

I’ve previously written here about Animals in Rental Properties, but through the course of 2020, we’ve seen several highly covered Tribunal and court cases battling for pet owners to have the right to keep pets in apartments.

Recently we’ve seen COVID-19 effectively increase the number of tenants seeking approval to keep pets in rental properties and whilst there are fewer obstacles getting pets approved in some properties, the issues surrounding approval becomes complicated where the property is part of a Strata Plan, a community of apartments or townhouses.

In some high-profile cases in Sydney, we see appeal after appeal where ultimately, it’s up to the building’s individual Strata Committee to approve or decline applications for pets.

In New South Wales, the default is no longer to ban pets, but instead allow pets after you obtain written approval from the Strata Committee, which can’t be unreasonably refused. This was a New South Wales legislative change which forms part of the Strata Schemes Management Regulations 2016.

However, this doesn’t consider a strata property’s individual by-laws. Even though legislation provides for the occupier of a strata apartment to have a pet, that doesn’t mean you have the strata committee’s approval. Strata Committees get to choose which by-laws it wants to incorporate into their strata scheme. Saying this, the recent unanimous ruling by three sitting judges from the NSW Court of Appeal, on a four-and-a-half-year battle between Jo Cooper (pet owner) and the Horizon building in Darlinghurst, now means that no blanket ban on pets will be permitted in any building anywhere in the state of NSW. You can read the article here, written by Sue Williams, Domain Reporter.

Prior to bringing a pet into a strata property, you’ll need to send a written request to the Strata Committee seeking permission. This applies even if your building is pet-friendly, and some strata managing agents may have a dedicated application form for this process.

Every Strata Committee will require different information but some of the information requested could be;

  • A description of your pet i.e. the pets breed, size and age
  • Details of your pet’s disposition, such as temperament and its activity needs
  • Proof of registration, microchipping, de-sexing, and all necessary vaccinations
  • References from former landlords, agent, or neighbours that mention your pet’s behaviour, particularly if you have previously kept a pet in a strata managed complex
  • Records of any formal pet training

In the application process, I feel that what’s considered strongly will be;

  • The by-laws for the particular building
  • The type, size, and number of pets
  • The size of the property vs. the size and the number of pets
  • If the pet will suitably fit in with the Strata Plan
  • Your personal routine i.e. if you work from home or take your pet to work

Whilst applications can’t be unreasonably denied, I think it’s fair to say that a large active dog won’t be approved for a small apartment unless, for instance, its owner takes the dog to work with them all day, every day.

If you reside in a rental property, you need to be aware that the landlord of the property is allowed to exercise their discretion on whether or not a pet is permitted by tenants in their apartment. In order to seek approval from the Strata Committee, the tenant’s pet application should be first submitted to the landlord (or Property Manager if managed by an Agency) for approval and then once approved by the landlord or agent, they will submit the pet application to the Strata Committee for you, so essentially this two-step process has to happen before a pet can be kept at the property.

“It is important to note that under the Hearing and Assistance Dogs Act 2009, any person who relies on a guide, hearing or assistance dog (and who has the right to be on a lot included in a community titles scheme, or on the common property) has the right to be accompanied their service dog, regardless of a strata committee’s by-laws on pets.” PICA Group.

So, it is worth looking into further.

For Tenants – find out what the owner’s position is on pets first, find out if there are other pets in the complex and therefore the by-laws are more likely to allow pets.

For Owners – it may be worth looking into getting a tenant approved to keep a pet, as I’ve written before most pet owners are responsible ones and can become long term tenants. For the most part, in my experience, renting to tenants with pets is a trouble-free experience.


Antonio Mesiti is the Principal & Property Manager at The Management Agency, a local Property Management specialist offering a one on one and end to end service for his Property Investor clients. For more information visit; https://themanagementagency.com.au/about/

Repairs, Maintenance & Fair Wear & Tear

16 September 2020

Taking care & looking after a rental property is a shared responsibility between tenants, landlords, and the Property Manager if managed by a Real Estate Agency.

The landlord is responsible for ensuring that the property is fit to live in and that repairs and maintenance are completed so that the property is in a reasonable state of repair. The tenant is responsible for keeping the property reasonably clean and undamaged and leave it in the same condition it was in when they moved in (fair wear and tear excepted). If the property is managed through a Real Estate Agency, then the Property Manager will act on behalf of the Landlord and will ensure that the property is fit to live in and is the go-to person, for the tenant to report any repairs or maintenance issues that arise during the tenancy.

What happens when maintenance and repairs are needed?

A tenant should contact their Property Manager or Landlord (if not managed by an Agency) as soon as possible and report the maintenance and/or repairs that are needed.

The Property Manager will need to identify how the maintenance and/or repair came to light. Was it due to damage caused by the tenant or just wear and tear?

If it was damaged caused by the tenant, then the tenant will be responsible for the reasonable cost of repairing, restoration and/or replacement to rectify the damage, however, if it is wear and tear, then the landlord will bear the costs.

What is ‘fair wear & tear’?

Fair wear and tear, is a term for damage that either naturally or inevitably occurs as a result of normal use and/or ageing. Another way to look at it is, fair wear and tear is damage that occurs even when an item is used competently and with care and proper maintenance. This covers property fixtures and items that deteriorate over time due to daily use and/or ageing.

Some of these are:

  • Worn kitchen benchtops
  • Worn handles or hinges
  • Scuffed flooring on the carpet on high traffic foot areas

On the other hand, it is not, wear and tear when the damage to the property is due to an accident, negligence, or even malicious.

Some of these are:

  • Burns on kitchen benchtops
  • Holes in the walls
  • Stains or burn marks on the carpet

As an example, carpet has an expected lifespan of 10 years, and therefore wear and tear consistent with its lifespan is expected, so daily walking on the carpet will result in wear and tear.

However, excessive staining, like from a spilled glass of red wine would not be considered ‘fair wear and tear’.

Somethings aren’t always as clear cut, so your Property Manager will need to apply some common sense and ask the right questions in order to make an informed decision on whether or not the damage is ‘fair wear and tear’.

Saying that fair wear and tear is not always something that requires repair, but simply needs to be taken into account based on the age and economical life of a fixture or fitting. Fair wear and tear always has to be a consideration, for example, at a final inspection at the end of a tenancy.

‘Fair wear and tear’ forms part of a Lease Agreement

The NSW, Residential Tenancy Agreement (Lease Agreement) and the NSW, Tenant Information Statement both reference the term ‘fair wear and tear’. Fair wear and tear is the responsibility of the landlord, and tenants are not responsible for paying for ‘fair wear and tear’, however, tenants need to be aware that it is there obligation to leave the residential premises as nearly as possible in the same condition, fair wear and tear excepted, as at the commencement of the tenancy.

There is though, excessive wear and tear, which takes into account, how long tenants have resided in the property or how long it’s been since things like repainting or flooring have taken place.

Excessive wear and tear, is wear from use that isn’t normal and that can come from a lack of overall care taken or just too many people residing in a property, above what has been agreed, as noted on your Lease Agreement.

Tenants need to be mindful that the cost of repairs, or the restoration of, the premises or goods leased with the premises if it is a result of damage caused by the tenant, other than ‘fair wear and tear’, may be deducted from the bond.

Landlords, what you need is a Property Manager that knows the difference and can step in accordingly, and tenants, you need a Property Manager that’s willing to take the time to Inspect the property and explain what’s what.


Antonio Mesiti is the Principal & Property Manager at The Management Agency, a local Property Management specialist offering a one on one and end to end service for his Property Investor clients. For more information visit; https://themanagementagency.com.au/about/

Landlords, Tenants, Property Managers & COVID-19

What else could my Blog be about right now.

I was going to post about depreciation & had a few other topics I wanted to put out but as you all know; life is on pause right about now.

These weeks have been tough.

Property Managers everywhere are struggling to get through the mass of information and ideas on how to manage this crisis.

I realise, first and foremost that this is a Health Crisis and I’m yet to come across anyone that doesn’t agree with the Stage 3 lockdowns and overall need to #stayhome.

But what about the tenants that are staying at home but are worried that they can’t pay for their home. Yes, they’re struggling and I hear their stress and sympathise with them. Let’s also not forget that landlords have also lost work and like everyone, the bills keep coming in.

We need to find some happy mediums, even if these aren’t necessarily happy outcomes, but outcomes that everyone can live with.

So, I’m giving some tips to all on how we can ALL get through this. It may be obvious and it may be common sense but here goes;

Tenants

  • Look into what assistance is available; there are ample links and fact sheets available. Get them from trusted sources i.e. Government websites
  • Rest easy, there is a moratorium on evictions but, it’s been made clear, that doesn’t mean rent won’t accrue a debt if you don’t pay and also don’t approach your Property Manager or Landlord. If you can’t pay the full rent, pay what you can to keep any balances of rent owing low. Reach out for help!
  • Property Managers are trying to help where we can to negotiate good outcomes, we’re still waiting on further advice and information from the Government though. It is coming!
  • Speak to your Landlord or Property Manager, let us know your situation so that we can get back to you as soon as we know more

Landlords

  • If you don’t have landlord’s insurance by now, it may be too late with most providers having already cut off new policies
  • Speak to your agent and let them know your financial position, so that we have the complete picture
  • Our recommendations, as Property Managers, are just that. You will have the final say in any negotiations but you need to be open to them and compromise where possible
  • If your Property is for Lease or Vacant, it is time to align to the current rental market ASAP. Tenants are still out there looking. People are downsizing, economising and looking for the perfect Isolation pad.

 

And finally, to my fellow Property Managers. We’re having a tough time, seriously. Long hours, countless calls / emails and counselling sessions.

All the while we are taking a slight battering by the media and I’ve also been hearing of many pay cuts, cuts to working hours and layoffs in our industry.

 

Property Managers

  • Listen & be compassionate to all
  • Follow trusted sources and keep up to date & informed. Things are changing rapidly, almost hourly
  • Don’t be hasty and make rushed decisions; National Cabinet updates are coming
  • Follow your regular procedures until we know more
  • If you haven’t heard, don’t give anyone Financial Advice
  • Take serious precautions when you do have to go to properties, i.e. Physical distancing, masks, sanitizer & gloves
  • Adjust, adapt & Innovate as the way we do Property Management will be changed forever
  • Now is the time to go out of your way to help our landlords, tenants and tradespeople – Go the extra mile. How we perform during difficult times can cement and build long term relationships

Shoutout

A Huge Thank you needs to go out to the REINSW, REIA, Tom Panos, Jemmeson Fischer, Leanne Pilkington and the team at Novak Properties for the regular informative updates and webinars you are running constantly. You’ll all be remembered for your efforts during this time.

I greatly appreciate you all taking the time to generously share knowledge, your insights and practical advice simply to just help others and ensure we are all doing the right thing.

Keep your head up everyone, we’ll get through this.

Antonio

NSW Rental Reforms & Renewing Leases

5/3/2020

As a Property Manager, we spend a lot of time negotiating Lease Renewals as tenants’ leases come up to expire. My opinion is that it is ideal for both owners and tenants to have the security of having a lease in place.

With the recent NSW changes to Residential Tenancy Laws, I’m already seeing landlords reconsidering this and opting to have their tenants remaining on continuing agreements.

This is largely because of the changes relating to the costs incurred by tenants when they need to Break their Lease.

These changes are likely to see increased instances of vacancy periods and therefore loss of rent where the current lease arrangements provided landlords with much more security. For a landlord, being told that their property is vacant with little “compensation” being the Break fee, leaves them open to unpredictable and unforeseen vacancy periods.

“The question now, is it worth renewing a Lease, when they’re so easy for a tenant to break?”

Whilst a fixed-term lease provides tenants and landlords a period of security, with new legislation coming in on 23/3/2020, it’ll be easier for these leases to be broken by tenants so we might see more and more tenants leaving before the Lease expires simply because it’s more affordable to do so.

 

Close to a Lease expiring your options are to either;

  • Not renew a Lease and have continuing agreement where tenants provide you with 3 weeks’ notice to vacate at any point

Or

  • Renew a Lease where tenants can break the agreement by paying a set break fee as outlined below

New mandatory set break fees for fixed-term agreements

Mandatory set fees when a tenant breaks a fixed-term agreement early will apply to all new fixed-term agreements that are 3 years or less. This applies to agreements that are entered into from 23 March 2020 onwards.

The break fees are:

  • 4 weeks rent if less than 25% of the lease had expired
  • 3 weeks rent if 25% or more but less than 50% of the lease had expired
  • 2 weeks rent if 50% or more but less than 75% of the lease had expired
  • 1 week’s rent if 75% or more of the lease had expired.

Using the example of a 12-month tenancy agreement, a tenant would only be required to provide two weeks’ rent to their landlord (that is, an amount equal to two week’s rent) to end their agreement early, if seven months (or 58%) of the agreement had expired.


I’ll be speaking to my clients on a case by case basis as Leases come up for renewal throughout 2020 but already, I am hearing “What’s the point of a Lease”.

The consensus is that at least getting 3 weeks’ notice on a continuing agreement gives you more lead time to advertise and show the property to secure new tenants, it’s all about minimising vacancy here.

As a Property Manager, it’s my job to maximise my landlords investments, and where leases are renewed at a cost to landlords it might not be the best investment to all clients when you consider a lease can be broken in the last 3 months and all the owner will receive is 1 weeks rent as the set break fee.

While there are many other changes to legislation coming in, which I’ve covered in my posts, I feel this change will have the greatest impact on both landlords and tenants.

Landlords face uncertainty in terms of the higher probability of lost income and Tenants face not having the offer or opportunity to renew their lease and get some long-term security in their homes.

My opinion is that there are no real winners here, unfortunately.

While it may sound advantageous to tenants being able to more affordably break their lease and move, long term investors may simply be turned off investing and may simply not offer the tenants that want to secure longer leases, the option.

As an investor, will I be renewing my tenant’s leases? Probably not, unless I’ve got tenants that really demand it and where I feel they’ll give me the courtesy of some notice of their vacating rather than none.

“What’s crucial here, is keeping good working relationships with tenants. Relationships where tenants will communicate any changes in circumstances to their Property Manager. So that we will get the heads up and some notice, even though the tenant doesn’t technically have to provide it.”

As Property Managers, it’ll be in our, and our client’s best interests that we keep our eyes and ears open and are attentive to our tenant’s movements and their circumstances.

Antonio @ The Management Agency

Changes to Residential Tenancy Laws – Read here for Updates

25/03/2020

Amidst the current Corona Virus climate, we’re adapting to the changes to the Residential Tenancies Act.

Whilst some of the new regulations surrounding Agents licensing won’t be enforced for a grace period of 6 Months, most agencies have already implemented new procedures surrounding their tenancies being compliant.

What are we hearing so far:

  • Owners not particularly liking tenants having their contact details, privacy concerns and the reasons why they have enlisted a Property Manager
  • Less emphasis on wanting fixed term leases, a lose lose for all maybe

The positive:

  • Tenants can sign electronic leases without needing a witness, a streamlined process for all

We’ll all adapt and innovate, as we must in these times.

Stay safe, Antonio


The latest release of up to date information issued by the Office of Fair Trading can be found here.

More information to follow here below as it comes to hand.

Antonio @ The Management Agency


9/3/2020

Further information is coming to light with regards to the changes coming into place on 23/3/2020 with many Property Managers hopeful we’ll have the complete outlook within the coming weeks, especially when it comes to the time frames in which all of the changes need to be in place, where some of these are immediate and others won’t be.

Here are some points I’ve been reading about;

  • New Leases from 23/3/2020 will need to list one of the Landlords points of contacts, whether it be an email address or phone number, this is set to be a requirement and a non-negotiable.
  • All Landlords will need to read and sign a “Landlord Information Statement” this will ensure that all landlords are aware of all of their responsibilities when a Lease is entered into, we are yet to get our hands on a copy of the prescribed form.
  • Similar to Smoke Alarms, properties will need to be tested and certified for Water Efficiency at the beginning of tenancies where Water Usage is being charged and recouped from tenants.

More to come as we approach the commencement date of these reforms,

Antonio @ The Management Agency

Read more

Tenants’ Rights & Responsibilities

17/9/19

You have a lease, right? Well all of your rights and responsibilities are listed there but countless times I’ve signed up new leases and tenants just want to sign and get their keys.

I get it, you’re about to embark on several painful hours of moving and unpacking.

This can mean some nasty surprises along the way, such as water usage bills and the cost of breaking a lease. So, any Property Manager would highlight to a new tenant what they have to know and must read, but I’m going to try to simplify and outline what your BASIC rights and responsibilities are here. You still need to read your lease though and before signing it.

  • Paying Rent

Not one to play around with, this responsibility stands regardless of any issues being unaddressed.

There are other avenues to have any complaints heard and addressed but not paying rent leaves you vulnerable to having your tenancy terminated.

  • Breaking your Lease

Circumstances change and so is the legislation surrounding this, there are a couple of options for breaking leases within the agreement so know which one you are agreeing too before signing as that will apply despite pending legislation changes. Just know what you’re up for if you do need to move before the Fixed Term of your Lease expires.

  • A Right to Quiet Enjoyment of the Premises

Noise complaints, unapproved access to your home and other instances where you’re being disturbed are well documented and covered within your lease agreement. You have a right to enjoy the property peacefully and quietly. Access to the property should be approved by you in most instances.

Neighbours have the same right so you in turn must insure you’re not impeding on anyone’s else’s rights.

  •   A Property that is in a good state of repair

Repairs and maintenance, especially of an urgent nature, need to be acknowledged and attended to within reasonable time frames. These timeframes are well documented within your lease.

Make sure you report any issues in writing to your agent or owner so it’s well documented. Reporting repairs and issues also protects you as having fulfilled your obligation to notify your agent or owner so that they can then make arrangements. Get to know what’s classed as urgent and what isn’t and ensure you’re provided with contacts of preferred Emergency tradespeople.

  • Specific Building By-Laws

Each building has its own set of By-Laws and you need to be provided with these at the time of signing the lease so you know what to comply with.

  • A Condition Report

You must be provided with an In-going Condition Report at the time of your Lease Commencing, not after it’s commenced. This report should list the areas within the property and list the condition of fixtures within that area.

If you don’t complete a copy of the report within 7 days of your lease commencing, agree or disagree and make additional comments than the original report handed to you will be taken as being agreed to.

“Completing and submitting this report within the 7 days is the first thing you can do to ensure you get your bond back at the end of your tenancy.”

  • Complaint Handling & Resolution

Every tenant has a right to have their complaints acknowledged and addressed, you can go straight to the Principal of any agency with your complaints, lodge a complaint with the office of fair trading who will investigate the issue, there are tenancy advocacy services as well as lodging an application to the tribunal for a hearing of your matter.

First up though, speak to the agent or owner about your issue and document it, if all else fails you have other avenues.

  • Renewing a Lease

When your lease is coming up to expire, ideally, you’ll be offered a new lease, if not then reach out and request a new lease if it’s your preference to have some ongoing certainty. Neither party is obligated to renew the lease but that doesn’t mean you need to vacate and can stay on indefinitely.

So in summary:

  •  Always pay rent on time
  • Breaking your lease, Read your lease and stay tuned for legislation changes
  • You have a right to peace and enjoyment of the premises, and you need to allow that of others as well
  • Property should be in a good state of repair, the onus is on you to report issues as they arise
  • Get to know your building By-Laws if you’re in a Strata Plan (Apartment complexes)
  • There are several avenues to get your complaints, issues heard or advice
  • Ask about renewing your lease even if it hasn’t been offered if you want the certainty

Lastly, you deserve (and have a right to) a reasonably responsive and courteous service so don’t settle for less.

If you need advice feel free to reach out, if for some reason I can’t answer your query then I can point you in the right direction.

Thanks for reading and if you have some left over downtime? Read your Lease ?

Antonio

Setting up, Styling & Settling into your new home

12/6/2019

When you’re looking for a new home it’s likely you will see a property while either an owner is residing there or the tenants that are set to soon vacate so you’ll get a rough idea of spacing and configuration.

Sometimes you’ll see a bare vacant property that for some can be hard to imagine or get your head around configuring it, and many prospective tenants are turned off easily when they just can’t see the potential.

But if Italians can make homes by carving into the calcareous rock (see pic by me taken today) in Matera, then you can make a home too!

Every property has potential to become a home and have seen many stunning transformations from bare and boring to homely and stylish.

For the most part a rental property is what it is so be sure to be generally happy with the flooring materials, light fittings and window coverings.

TIP: For whatever approvals are given through verbally, back that up with an email to confirm the conversation.

So after the physical move get the stylish & homely vibes you’re looking for;

  • Unpack

Start unpacking by focusing on the bedroom and bathroom so that somewhat of a normal routine can start up straight away and then onto the kitchen and living areas.

Whilst art, pictures and personal items aren’t priority do start unpacking and laying pictures around the house to get an idea of where they work best.

  • Lighting

For the most part lights are what they are, and what’s provided but bare bulbs can be easily shaded with essentially cheap and easily installed coverings

Floor Lamps, Table lamps, bench lamps- go crazy and set a mood with your lighting. Add floor lamps to dim and barren corners, table lamps on a kitchen bench or hallway console table.

  • Flooring

Rugs and Runners can cover anything so you can sometimes see past what’s there, saying that a lot of tenants specifically don’t want or can’t live with carpet whereas others love it.

  • Furniture

Few people, owners or tenants, are going to go and replace all of their furniture just because they’re moving into a new property so importantly- take a tape measure to viewings and check things like your Fridge space, washing machine space and Lounge to see if these will fit.

  • Walls & Art

While most rental properties should stick to a neutral color scheme, some don’t and orange or green walls will not be to everyone’s taste. If it’s a deal breaker you can apply on the basis that specific areas are painted or request permission to DIY once you move in.

  • Windows

Outdated or simply ugly blinds can be easily replaced with ready to hang blinds or curtains if you really want to update these. Just be sure to store what was there for when you do hand the property back. Some Ikea or Freedom curtains can work wonders.

TIP:

If in doubt you shouldn’t hesitate to contact your property manager to see what’s allowed and what isn’t and they should be able to assist so ask questions without reservation.

Properties are otherwise offered “as is” so what you see is what you’ll get if you don’t ask beforehand.

Welcome Home!
Antonio

Tips on Preventing and Managing Mould

22/2/19

Property Managers fear it, tenants hate it and owners are usually just confused by it but it is unfortunately a part of life in many properties in Sydney so we have to talk about Mould.

Why it’s a thing, why it’s an issue and a serious sticking point when it comes to renting, managing it and who exactly is responsible. So here goes!

Despite the common belief that there is always an underlying building issue or source of its appearance in many cases it just isn’t so as many properties are susceptible to mould due to factors such as a lack of natural light and ventilation and allowing a property to be ventilated to outside is a big factor in allowing mould to grow and spread.

Mould’s organisms (part of the common fungi group) are airborne everywhere, indoors and outdoors. It is in moist and inadequately ventilated areas’ that inhibits its growth it thrives on moisture and organic material.

Another important note is that mould needs to be cleaned / killed as it appears but not just from walls, from clothing, glass and window frames really wherever it appears and thoroughly. It will otherwise continue to grow if the environment allows it to. All forms of mould have some potential to cause health problems.

The responsibility of a mould issue can be summarised by Landlords being required to address any dampness issue, i.e. a leak or water penetration issue that is causing the problem, however a tenant must ventilate the premises and is advised to clean mould as it appears.

There are ways in which mould can be managed and in a Residential Tenancy it does require some effort on the tenant’s part so here are some tips I’ve gathered from NSW Health, the office of fair trading, experience as well as other agents.

Some Important Points:

  • If not removed/ cleaned then mould will grow and spread. Mould can be removed using either a household bleach, specific mould cleaning product or wiping down the area with Vinegar.
  • The appearance of mould does not always indicate that there is an underlying issue i.e. a leak or water penetration issue.

How to Prevent Mould and Manage it

Allow and ensure proper ventilation as preventative meaning;

  • Ventilate areas to the outside, windows and doors whenever possible and practical
  • While drying clothes, either hanging or using a dryer, ensure you ventilate or do so in a cool area of the property to ensure less moisture is held in the air
  • Use any available exhaust fans or vents in bathrooms or laundry
  • Dry clothes and footwear thoroughly prior to storing them
  • Do not block any fan vents and keep free of any build up
  • Allow Sunlight into the home whenever possible by opening blinds during the day
  • Doors and windows should be open whenever practical, overnight condensation on windows should be allowed to dry or dried out where possible
  • Furniture and items should not be pushed up directly against the walls, as this creates dark airless areas allowing for mould to grow
  • Dehumidifiers do work when used, most agents or landlords will happily supply one when requested, they draw moisture out of the air in affected areas, they may not be a permanent solution but they do what ventilating would do when you can’t ventilate properly or securely

“Regular ventilation and cleaning of any mould that appears should prevent re occurrence”

Mould Removal Australia has kindly compiled a Fact Sheet on the prevention and treatment of mould, if you’d like a copy just send through an enquiry and i’ll send it over to you.

Hope this can somewhat dispel some theories and thoughts about Mould, let me know if you have any other thoughts or want to ready about any other issues. I’m all ears!

Oh & the Pic is actually Marble because… ewww Mould.

Antonio 🙂